Tuesday, November 20, 2012

 

By Mick Mulvey

IN the old ballroom of the Town Hall, which is now the Naas Town Council chamber, there is on the wall a roll of honour of past and present chairpersons of the council since its inception in 1900 and the Mayors of Naas Town Council from the time of the change over from Urban Council to Town Council. On studying the roll of honour there are five family names that stand out. Fitzsimons, Dowling, Callaghan, McCormack and Grehan. Michael Fitzsimons was first elected to Naas UDC. in 1905 and the following year he was elected chairman. For the following seven years he was re-elected to this position. He was again elected in 1925 and served for another seven years, returning to the office of chairman in 1942 and he held that office until 1953 when he died while still in office. In total Mr. Fitzsimons was in the position of chairman for 30years. His son Patrick J Fitzsimons was co-opted on to the U.D.C. in 1953 taking his father’s seat. He was subsequently re-elected in every election until 1978. In 1960 he elected chairperson but never sought to be elected to the chair again. The Fitzsimons family was in business at Number 34 South Main Street, Naas, from the late 1800s as auctioneers and then as publicans and grocers in the early part of the 1900s. The grocery shop was then converted to a bicycle shop. 1911 was the first year that James Dowling, a publican in Main Street, was elected to the UDC. In 1912 Mr Dowling purchased a bar and grocery business at Barrack Gate on the Newbridge Road which eventually became known as “Swan Dowlings”. Many years after the Dowling family sold the business people of the author’s generation still refer to the business, which is now a standalone licensed premises, as “Swan Dowlings” and the name over the door in 2012 is still Swan Dowlings. After the 1934 council election James Dowling was elected chairperson of the local authority being returned to that office five times more. In 1939 his son Noel, who ran a garage where the Apple Green Service Station is now located, was co-opted on to the council. However he did not seek election again. His brother Thomas G Dowling was elected as a member of the council carrying on the tradition started by his father 42 years earlier. The year after his election in 1954 he was voted chairperson and returned to the highest office of the town five more times. After a break of three years Mr Dowling was again the choice of his fellow councillors in 1963 and for several years after. The Dowling family dynasty therefore had three members of their family serving on Naas U.D.C. The attached newspaper cutting shows an advertisement that appeared in the local press at the time for James Dowling of Barrack Gate House.Town Hall Political Dynasties By Mick Mulvey IN the old ballroom of the Town Hall, which is now the Naas Town Council chamber, there is on the wall a roll of honour of past and present chairpersons of the council since its inception in 1900 and the Mayors of Naas Town Council from the time of the change over from Urban Council to Town Council. On studying the roll of honour there are five family names that stand out. Fitzsimons, Dowling, Callaghan, McCormack and Grehan. Michael Fitzsimons was first elected to Naas UDC. in 1905 and the following year he was elected chairman. For the following seven years he was re-elected to this position. He was again elected in 1925 and served for another seven years, returning to the office of chairman in 1942 and he held that office until 1953 when he died while still in office. In total Mr. Fitzsimons was in the position of chairman for 30years. His son Patrick J Fitzsimons was co-opted on to the U.D.C. in 1953 taking his father’s seat. He was subsequently re-elected in every election until 1978. In 1960 he elected chairperson but never sought to be elected to the chair again. The Fitzsimons family was in business at Number 34 South Main Street, Naas, from the late 1800s as auctioneers and then as publicans and grocers in the early part of the 1900s. The grocery shop was then converted to a bicycle shop. 1911Tales from the Town Hall Political Dynasties By Mick Mulvey IN the old ballroom of the Town Hall, which is now the Naas Town Council chamber, there is on the wall a roll of honour of past and present chairpersons of the council since its inception in 1900 and the Mayors of Naas Town Council from the time of the change over from Urban Council to Town Council. On studying the roll of honour there are five family names that stand out. Fitzsimons, Dowling, Callaghan, McCormack and Grehan. Michael Fitzsimons was first elected to Naas UDC. in 1905 and the following year he was elected chairman. For the following seven years he was re-elected to this position. He was again elected in 1925 and served for another seven years, returning to the office of chairman in 1942 and he held that office until 1953 when he died while stillTales from the Town Hall Political Dynasties By Mick Mulvey IN the old ballroom of the Town Hall, which is now the Naas Town Council chamber, there is on the wall a roll of honour of past and present chairpersons of the council since its inception in 1900 and the Mayors of Naas Town Council from the time of the change over from Urban Council to Town Council. On studying the roll of honour there are five family names that stand out. Fitzsimons, Dowling, Callaghan, McCormack and Grehan. Michael Fitzsimons was first elected to Naas UDC. in 1905 and the following year he was elected chairman. For the following seven years he was re-elected to this position. He was again elected in 1925 and served for another seven years, returning to the office of chairman in 1942 and he held that office until 1953 when he died while still in office. In total Mr. Fitzsimons was in the position of chairman for 30years. His son Patrick J Fitzsimons was co-opted on to the U.D.C. in 1953 taking his father’s seat. He was subsequently re-elected in every election until 1978. In 1960 he elected chairperson but never sought to be elected to the chair again. The Fitzsimons family was in business at Number 34 South Main Street, Naas, from the late 1800s as auctioneers and then as publicans and grocers in the early part of the 1900s. The grocery shop was then converted to a bicycle shop. 1911 was the first year that James Dowling, a publican in Main Street, was elected to the UDC. In 1912 Mr Dowling purchased a bar and grocery business at Barrack Gate on the Newbridge Road which eventually became known as “Swan DowTales from the Town Hall Political Dynasties By Mick Mulvey IN the old ballroom of the Town Hall, which is now the Naas Town Council chamber, there is on the wall a roll of honour of past and present chairpersons of the council since its inception in 1900 and the Mayors of Naas Town Council from the time of the change over from Urban Council to Town Council. On studying the roll of honour there are five family names that stand out. Fitzsimons, Dowling, Callaghan, McCormack and Grehan. Michael Fitzsimons was first elected to Naas UDC. in 1905 and the following year he was elected chairman. For the following seven years he was re-elected to this position. He was again elected in 1925 and served for another seven years, returning to the office of chairman in 1942 and he held that office until 1953 when he died while still in office. In total Mr. Fitzsimons was in the position of chairman for 30years. His son Patrick J Fitzsimons was co-opted on to the U.D.C. in 1953 taking his father’s seat. He was subsequently re-elected in every election until 1978. In 1960 he elected chairperson but never sought to be elected to the chair again. The Fitzsimons family was in business at Number 34 South Main Street, Naas, from the late 1800s as auctioneers and then as publicans and grocers in the early part of the 1900s. The grocery shop was then converted to a bicycle shop. 1911 was the first year that James Dowling, a publican in Main Street, was elected to the UDC. In 1912 Mr Dowling purchased a bar and grocery business at Barrack Gate on the Newbridge Road which eventually became known as “Swan Dowlings”. Many years after the Dowling family sold the business people of the author’s generation still refer to the business,Tales from the Town Hall Political Dynasties By Mick Mulvey IN the old ballroom of the Town Hall, which is now the Naas Town Council chamber, there is on the wall a roll of honour of past and present chairpersons of the council since its inception in 1900 and the Mayors of Naas Town Council from the time of the change over from Urban Council to Town Council. On studying the roll of honour there are five family names that stand out. Fitzsimons, Dowling, Callaghan, McCormack and Grehan. Michael Fitzsimons was first elected to Naas UDC. in 1905 and the following year he was elected chairman. For the following seven years he was re-elected to this position. He was again elected in 1925 and served for another seven years, returning to the office of chairman in 1942 and he held that office until 1953 when he died while still in office. In total Mr. Fitzsimons was in the position of chairman for 30years. His son Patrick J Fitzsimons was co-opted on to the U.D.C. in 1953 taking his father’s seat. He was subsequently re-elected in every election until 1978. In 1960 he elected chairperson but never sought to be elected to the chair again. The Fitzsimons family was in business at Number 34 South Main Street, Naas, from the late 1800s as auctioneers and then as publicans and grocers in the early part of the 1900s. The grocery shop was then converted to a bicycle shop. 1911 was the first year that James Dowling, a publican in Main Street, was elected to the UDC. In 1912 Mr Dowling purchased a bar and grocery business at Barrack Gate on the Newbridge Road which eventually became known as “Swan Dowlings”. Many years after the Dowling family sold the business people of the author’s generation still refer to the business, which is now a standalone licensed premises, as “Swan Dowlings” and the name over the door in 2012 is still Swan Dowlings. After the 1934 council election James Dowling was elected chairperson of the local authority being returned to that office five times more. In 1939 his son Noel, who ran a garage where the Apple Green Service Station is now located, was co-opted on to the council. However he did not seek election again. His brother Thomas G Dowling was elected as a member of the council carrying on the tradition started by his father 42 years earlier. The year after his election in 1954 he was voted chairperson and returned to the highest office of the town five more times. After a break of three years Mr Dowling was again the choice of his fellow councillors in 1963 and for several years after. The Dowling family dynasty therefore had three members of their family serving on Naas U.D.C. The attached newspaper cutting shows an advertisement that appeared in the local press at the time for James Dowling of Barrack Gate House. which is now a standalone licensed premises, as “Swan Dowlings” and the name over the door in 2012 is still Swan Dowlings. After the 1934 council election James Dowling was elected chairperson of the local authority being returned to that office five times more. In 1939 his son Noel, who ran a garage where the Apple Green Service Station is now located, was co-opted on to the council. However he did not seek election again. His brother Thomas G Dowling was elected as a member of the council carrying on the tradition started by his father 42 years earlier. The year after his election in 1954 he was voted chairperson and returned to the highest office of the town five more times. After a break of three years Mr Dowling was again the choice of his fellow councillors in 1963 and for several years after. The Dowling family dynasty therefore had three members of their family serving on Naas U.D.C. The attached newspaper cutting shows an advertisement that appeared in the local press at the time for James Dowling of Barrack Gate House.lings”. Many years after the Dowling family sold the business people of the author’s generation still refer to the business, which is now a standalone licensed premises, as “Swan Dowlings” and the name over the door in 2012 is still Swan Dowlings. After the 1934 council election James Dowling was elected chairperson of the local authority being returned to that office five times more. In 1939 his son Noel, who ran a garage where the Apple Green Service Station is now located, was co-opted on to the council. However he did not seek election again. His brother Thomas G Dowling was elected as a member of the council carrying on the tradition started by his father 42 years earlier. The year after his election in 1954 he was voted chairperson and returned to the highest office of the town five more times. After a break of three years Mr Dowling was again the choice of his fellow councillors in 1963 and for several years after. The Dowling family dynasty therefore had three members of their family serving on Naas U.D.C. The attached newspaper cutting shows an advertisement that appeared in the local press at the time for James Dowling of Barrack Gate House. in office. In total Mr. Fitzsimons was in the position of chairman for 30years. His son Patrick J Fitzsimons was co-opted on to the U.D.C. in 1953 taking his father’s seat. He was subsequently re-elected in every election until 1978. In 1960 he elected chairperson but never sought to be elected to the chair again. The Fitzsimons family was in business at Number 34 South Main Street, Naas, from the late 1800s as auctioneers and then as publicans and grocers in the early part of the 1900s. The grocery shop was then converted to a bicycle shop. 1911 was the first year that James Dowling, a publican in Main Street, was elected to the UDC. In 1912 Mr Dowling purchased a bar and grocery business at Barrack Gate on the Newbridge Road which eventually became known as “Swan Dowlings”. Many years after the Dowling family sold the business people of the author’s generation still refer to the business, which is now a standalone licensed premises, as “Swan Dowlings” and the name over the door in 2012 is still Swan Dowlings. After the 1934 council election James Dowling was elected chairperson of the local authority being returned to that office five times more. In 1939 his son Noel, who ran a garage where the Apple Green Service Station is now located, was co-opted on to the council. However he did not seek election again. His brother Thomas G Dowling was elected as a member of the council carrying on the tradition started by his father 42 years earlier. The year after his election in 1954 he was voted chairperson and returned to the highest office of the town five more times. After a break of three years Mr Dowling was again the choice of his fellow councillors in 1963 and for several years after. The Dowling family dynasty therefore had three members of their family serving on Naas U.D.C. The attached newspaper cutting shows an advertisement that appeared in the local press at the time for James Dowling of Barrack Gate House. was the first year that James Dowling, a publican in Main Street, was elected to the UDC. In 1912 Mr Dowling purchased a bar and grocery business at Barrack Gate on the Newbridge Road which eventually became known as “Swan Dowlings”. Many years after the Dowling family sold the business people of the author’s generation still refer to the business, which is now a standalone licensed premises, as “Swan Dowlings” and the name over the door in 2012 is still Swan Dowlings. After the 1934 council election James Dowling was elected chairperson of the local authority being returned to that office five times more. In 1939 his son Noel, who ran a garage where the Apple Green Service Station is now located, was co-opted on to the council. However he did not seek election again. His brother Thomas G Dowling was elected as a member of the council carrying on the tradition started by his father 42 years earlier. The year after his election in 1954 he was voted chairperson and returned to the highest office of the town five more times. After a break of three years Mr Dowling was again the choice of his fellow councillors in 1963 and for several years after. The Dowling family dynasty therefore had three members of their family serving on Naas U.D.C. The attached newspaper cutting shows an advertisement that appeared in the local press at the time for James Dowling of Barrack Gate House.

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